February 20, 2017

Deon Cain: 8 Plays

Clemson wide receiver Deon Cain (8) rallies the team. The Clemson Tigers played host to the Syracuse Orange at Memorial Stadium, Saturday, November 5, 2016. Gwinn Davis / The Post and Courier

8 plays from Deon Cain.

 

Previous Editions of 8 Plays:

8 plays from Jordan Leggett

8 plays from Wayne Gallman

8 plays from the defensive backfield

8 plays from Mike Williams

8 plays from linebackers

8 plays from defensive line

8 Plays: Defensive Line

Pitt quarterback Nathan Peterman (4) fires a pass as Clemson defensive lineman Dexter Lawrence (90) defends.  Gwinn Davis / The Post and Courier

8 plays from the Clemson defensive line.

 

Previous Editions:

8 plays from Jordan Leggett

8 plays from Wayne Gallman

8 plays from the defensive backfield

8 plays from Mike Williams

8 plays from linebackers

8 Plays: Linebackers

Clemson linebacker Ben Boulware (10) celebrate the fourth down stop. GWINN DAVIS / FOR POST AND COURIER

8 plays from the Clemson linebackers.

 

Previous Editions:

8 plays from Jordan Leggett

8 plays from Wayne Gallman

8 plays from the defensive backfield

8 plays from Mike Williams

CFB Trends: Part 6

Other than points, perhaps the most important metric in college football – yards per play. Out of all the metrics I track, none has a higher winning percentage than winning the yards per play advantage over your opponent – not even winning the turnover battle.  The gap has held relatively steady – starting at 1.25 in 2011 and sitting at 1.26 in 2016, though there have been some swings (2013!) along the way.

But again, year in and year out, the fact remains – more plays, more yards and especially more yards per play = winner.

Previously in Series:
CFB Trends Part 1 – Home field advantage?
CFB Trends Part 2 – Vegas knows – favorites win
CFB Trends Part 3 – You’re not imagining it – scoring is up
CFB Trends Part 4 – Everybody runs 70 plays a game
 CFB Trends Part 5 – Yards, yards and yards

8 Plays: Mike Williams

Clemson wide receiver Mike Williams 
GWINN DAVIS PHOTOS

8 beautiful plays from Mike Williams (via Deshaun Watson).

Other iterations:

8 plays from Jordan Leggett

8 plays from Wayne Gallman

8 plays from the defensive backfield

CFB Trends – Part 5

Yards matter. Sure, there’s games where the team with less yards win, but it’s more likely that the team with more yards is going to win the game – which makes the stat we just looked at – plays per game – important and the one up next – yards per play – even more important.  The graph below makes the big picture clear: Teams that gain more yards than their opponents win.

Not only that, but the margin is getting larger.  In 2011 there was a 100 yard difference on average between winners and losers.  By 2016 that number had grown to 104.1.

Previously in Series:
CFB Trends Part 1 – Home field advantage?
CFB Trends Part 2 – Vegas knows – favorites win
CFB Trends Part 3 – You’re not imagining it – scoring is up
CFB Trends Part 4 – Everybody runs 70 plays a game
 

Defensive Backs: 8 Plays

Clemson corner Marcus Edmond saved the day once again (Photo: Gwinn Davis/gwinndavisphotos.com)

8 plays from 2016 for the Clemson defensive backs.

These are Good Times for Clemson

“Good Times”.

College Football Trends – Part 4

The numbers below are derived from 4,339 college football games between 2011-2016 that involved 2 FBS teams.

Remember when Chad Morris came to town and said 70 plays means Clemson wins?  Turns out he was right the vast majority of the time, but now “everybody” runs 70+ plays a game in college football.  One thing, however, has been consistent: Teams that run more plays on offense win more than than teams that run less.

Previously in Series:
CFB Trends Part 1 – Home field advantage?

CFB Trends Part 2 – Vegas knows – favorites win

CFB Trends Part 3 – You’re not imagining it – scoring is up

 

Teamwork

I’ve shown the play below multiple times, in multiple scenarios, but I’ve never specifically pointed out why this play was successful (h/t to SUR message board members who alerted me).  So, for this iteration, I’ve added a couple of freeze frames to illustrate.  At the snap of the ball Mike Williams realizes that Tavarus McFadden is blitzing, stops his route and points to him (first freeze frame Williams is near bottom left of screen under “World Series” on the crawl). Wayne Gallman, who is looking for someone to block in the middle, sees the blitz and moves back to block McFadden (second freeze frame) and stop him from blindsiding Deshaun Watson. Deshaun throws, Leggett catches and rumbles, Tigers win.